Building my legacy

There was a TV program on Tuesday night called Building a Legacy which I tuned into and loved. Fundamentally it was about architecture – one of my favourite topics – and featured notable Australian homes built over the last 80 odd years. It told the architect’s story and the inspirations for the buildings and took us on a tour through them, with interviews with the architect or, more often, their surviving relatives or current residents.

There were some beautiful homes, some quite simple, and others quite bold. I love these things so much that I felt a sense of yearning as I watched. I’ve thought that given my druthers I might have elected to become an architect instead. It appeals to a sense in me perfectly combined of creativity and science. I missed that boat, but as I watched on Tuesday night, I thought to myself I would happily settle for living in a home like these.

It stirred up memories also. When I was just a young boy, my parents built the house that would become our home. I can recollect being picked up from primary school by my dad and on the way home stopping by the building site as our home to be went up. I can only imagine the satisfaction it must have given him to see it come together. It’s a rare pleasure to observe all your plans and careful designs come into being. As a kid, I remember I felt excited too – but then, most construction sites are exciting to boys.

I have memories too of our family group venturing out on weekends to visit display homes. That was once quite the thing. I don’t think I always enjoyed this quite so much – being dragged around to view empty homes every weekend. I’m not sure when this happened – my dates seem muddled. Logic suggests that it must have been before we started building our house, but I’m sure it was later than that. It begs the question – was there plans to build another home? I can’t recall, though I remember there was a house from one particular architect or builder that they were keen on – and I can see the house in my mind, modern and stylish.

I should have asked my dad the other day.

By chance, the first thing on Wednesday morning I finally interviewed for the role I applied for over Christmas. It’s with a company specialising in urban design.

Apparently, recruitment did what recruitment often does best – it overlooks the best candidates. When my application came through, it was put in the do not contact pile. It was only picked up when the guy filling the role asked what had happened to my application. I’d sent him my CV initially, and so he knew of me and asked HR to track me down.

The interview went well, and apparently, I’m now on a shortlist of three. From what I can gather – and this is from my mate who works there – the frontrunner is someone who has direct experience with their (quite obscure) ERP system, as well as Power BI – I don’t have either. I’m behind the eight ball there, but they see me as someone who can get things done.

The thing is, when they asked what appealed to me about the role I was quite honest in telling them I had a great interest in their industry, and actually made reference to the program I watched the night before. It’s too late for to become an architect, but to be in a position to facilitate great things and feel some part of it would be very satisfying.

Right now it’s my standby option. In theory, the promotion should come through where I am now, though nothing is ever certain with them – a point I reiterated to their face yesterday. It’s at a higher level than the role I interviewed for, and common sense dictates that it should be the preferred option. I’m not always sure about that, though.

Let’s see how things play out. I could be offered both. Neither may eventuate. As so often, fate will decide.

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