A grateful moment

I had the best sort of chance encounter today.

I had a physio appointment this morning. The physiological is located within the main building of a retirement village. I’ve been three times now, and each time it’s been a hive of activity, as well as being vaguely depressing. I guess lively is good, considering the alternative, but I come away each time thinking I never want to end up in such a place.

As I was sitting in the car preparing to leave afterwards, a tap came at my window. There was an old man there. He’d have been over eighty, short – about 5’5″ – and bent over clutching a walking stick. I wound the window down. “If I give you $10,” he said, “will you take me to Centre Road?”

I couldn’t knock him back and, declining his money, told him to hop in.

As we drove, we talked. I asked him polite questions and, like a lot of elderly people, he was pleased to answer at length. It was only a short drive, 7-8 minutes, and I was happy to listen.

In the way of things he told me he’d been at the home for 18 years. He’d moved into a villa unit with his wife, before shifting into main accommodation because of a disagreeable neighbour. I gathered his wife was dead.

He was Jewish he told me and had settled in Ivanhoe after coming to Australia, until all the kids grew up and the neighbourhood changed. He had two sons, one in Melbourne, and the other living in Israel.

I asked him what his home country was. He told me he came here from France in 1949, though he was from Poland originally. He’s survived the Nazis (his word), but it had been very hard. France had been difficult, too. He needed a permit for everything, and he’d been told he should go back to where he’d come from. Instead, he came to Australia.

The main thing for him is that he wanted to get away from Europe. Initially, he was going to go to Canada, but that changed, and he ended up in Sydney before coming to Melbourne. It was the best thing he’d ever done.

And on that, we parted. I pulled up by the side of the road near Bentleigh station, we shook hands, and slowly he unbent himself getting out of the car.

As I had said to him when he thanked me, it was my good deed for the day. I actually got a great deal of satisfaction from meeting him, and being able to help him. It’s moments like this that open your heart and – without knowing exactly why – you come to understand the meaning of being grateful.

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